2020 Scholarship Recipients

The Haywood County Schools Foundation awarded 104 Pisgah, Tuscola, Haywood Early College, and Central Haywood high school seniors with 130 scholarships totaling $227,750 last week. Scholarship amounts ranged from $250 to $40,000.

Typically, students are surprised at school with the news, but this year student were notified via mail.

“This school year has been challenging and anything but ordinary for our students, so awarding these scholarships was a positive way to end their senior year,” Jenny Wood, Haywood County Schools Foundation executive director, said. “A large portion of our scholarships come from endowed money, but several come from individuals and businesses in the community. We were so thankful that almost every single one of those made the commitment to still provide a scholarship despite the shaky economy we’ve experience recently.”

Currently, the Foundation manages more than 60 scholarships. Scholarships may be endowed or funded annually. Criteria for awarding the scholarship are designed by the donors and the Foundation Board of Directors. Endowed scholarships are generated through the investment of permanently-held principals, so that only the income from the principal is used for scholarship awards.

For more information about donating to a scholarship fund or setting up a scholarship through the Haywood County Schools Foundation, contact Executive Director Jenny Wood at 456-2400 or visit www.hcsf.haywood.k12.nc.us.

2020 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
• Coleman Ammons, THS: Haywood County Community Band
• Tiffany Barrett, PHS: Reeves Memorial
• Jessica Bates, THS: Tuscola Class of 1972
• Walker Beasley, PHS: Haywood Realtor Association
• Abigail Bleakley, THS: Haywood County Democratic Women
• Molly Boothroyd, PHS: Smathers Cruso
• Owen Bowers, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Jena Brown, THS: Champion Credit Union-Roland Leatherwood and Mark Douglas Parris Memorial
• Bethany Buchanan, THS: Patricia C. Liner, RN Memorial
• Ethan Byers, HEC: Peggy Melville
• Jessica Cairnes, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Makenzie Caldwell, THS: Elayne Tucker Wadsworth Memorial
• Amanda Ceron, THS: Champion Credit Union-Roland Leatherwood
• Keely Cherry, THS: Dustin Travis Moody Memorial
• Sarah Clarke, THS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Noah Clontz, PHS: Jeff Simmons Memorial
• Keona Coleman, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Elke Craig, THS: Junaluska Ross-Lance
• Grace Cronk, THS: Altrusa International of Waynesville and Waynesville Lions Club-Charles Balentine Sr. Memorial
• Brayan Cruz, THS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Melissa Dellinger: THS, QuickDraw-Art and Tuscola Class of 1984
• Jadyn Denty, PHS: Dr. Kristen Hammett Vet Tech and Scott Sisters
• Marna Dodson, THS: Adeline B. Patrick Memorial and Steve Sutton Memorial
• Lilly Ensley, PHS: Cynthia Shepherd Culbertson Memorial
• Morgan Fetsko, HEC: QuickDraw-Art
• Audrey Fields, CHHS: Reeves Family Memorial
• Kylie Fisher, PHS: PHS Golden Anniversary
• John Francis, THS: John C. Howell Memorial
• Felicia Frank, THS: Waynesville Woman’s Club
• Cooper Franklin, PHS: Clyde Lions Club-Somberg, McCracken & Hannah and Sportsman’s Club
• Josie Garner, THS: SECU People Helping People
• Carter Gibson, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Mercedes Gil, HEC: QuickDraw-Art
• Paige Griffith, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Trace Guyer, PHS: Waynesville Garden Club-Horticulture
• Aden Haider, PHS: SECU People Helping People
• Haylee Hall, PHS: Smathers Cruso
• John Harter, PHS: Junaluska Ross-Lance
• Sarah Haurey, HEC: Scott Sisters and Shay Barnes Starnes Memorial
• Faith Henson, PHS: Canton High School Class of 1957
• Benjamin Hites, THS: Dr. Alan & Rita M. Brown Memorial
• Ronald ‘Cub’ Hundley, HEC: Haywood County Retired School Personnel and Smathers Cruso
• Kennan Huskison, THS: James & Betty Scott Memorial
• William Huskison, THS: Tuscola Class of 1971 and Waynesville Lions Club-Charles Balentine Sr. Memorial
• William Hutchby, HEC, QuickDraw-Art and SECU People Helping People
• Isaiah Israel, PHS: United Community Bank
• Alexis Kang, HEC: Reuben B. Robertson Foundation
• Elijah Kirchoff, PHS: Haywood Rotary Club
• Hope Lafleur, THS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Alexia Livingston, THS: Posey Family and Tuscola Class of 1973
• Jennifer Luna Avala, THS: Waynesville Woman’s Club
• Xitlali Martin, PHS: Haywood County Democratic Women
• Fiona Masciarelli, THS: David Sherrill Memorial and QuickDraw-Art
• Kyrstin McClure, THS: Trooper Anthony Cogdill Memorial
• Savannah McEntire, PHS: Black Orthodontics and Haywood County Fraternal Order of Police
• Parker McMahon, THS: Charles K. Patterson Memorial
• Chloe Medford, PHS: Haywood County Schools Nutrition
• Leah Mehaffey, PHS: Betty Jean Henson Memorial and Scott Sisters
• Sydney Messer, PHS: Patricia C. Liner, RN Memorial
• Austin Metcalf, PHS: Champion Credit Union-Roland Leatherwood and Haywood Rotary Club
• Madison Mintz, PHS: Haywood Rotary Club and Shay Barnes Starnes Memorial
• Brooke Moore, PHS: Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of WNC-Vocational
• Zachariah Mull, PHS: Haywood Rotary Club
• Julio Murillo Valdovinos, THS: Moses L. Robinson Memorial and Tuscola Class of 1973
• Ellery Neal, PHS: Cynthia Shepherd Culbertson Memorial
• John Neyman, PHS: Haywood Rotary Club
• Maeanna Norris, PHS: Frank & Kathryn G. Kirkpatrick Memorial
• Trinity Norton, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Cade Parkins, HEC: Bill Sease Memorial
• Chloe Parris, PHS: James M. & Mary P. Edwards Memorial
• Ethan Passmore, PHS: Altrusa International of Waynesville, Haywood Regional Medical Center, and Trooper Calvin E. Taylor Memorial
• Olivia Payne, PHS: Cruso Friendship Club Jervis/Alexander
• Lily Payne, HEC: WOW – Lynda Chovan Memorial
• Patricia Morgan Plemmons, THS: QuickDraw-Art and Teri H. Hughes Memorial Performing Arts
• Riley Presnell, THS: Richie’s Alliance
• Bailey Price, HEC: Altrusa International of Waynesville and QuickDraw-Art
• Hailey Price, THS: United Community Bank
• Chloe Queen, PHS: Sonoma Masonic Lodge
• Anna Quinn, THS: B. L. Upton, Sr. & D. E. Tingle Memorial
• Ridge Ray, PHS: Kinsland Family and Sharon Blankenship AEOP
• Alivia Rich, THS: Robert E. & Viola Forga
• Abbey Roberts, HEC: Scott Sisters
• Juan Rodriguez, PHS: Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of WNC-Vocational
• David Rolland, PHS: Mary Gillis Educational Memorial and Tom Cifani Memorial for Music
• Jammylee Saintons, THS: Waynesville Woman’s Club
• Carter Shook, PHS: Waynesville Garden Club-Horticulture
• Travis Shuford, PHS: Patricia C. Liner, RN Memorial
• Allen Keith Simpkins, PHS: Haywood County Schools Foundation
• Sean Siske, CHHS: Haywood Rotary Club and Nick Mastriana Memorial
• Jonathan Smart, THS: Buddy Chandler Scholarship
• Joseph Smart, THS: Haywood Realtor Association and Tommy E. Davis Memorial
• Madisen Smith, PHS: Dr. Mack S. & Beulah Setser Memorial
• Hayden Stockton, PHS , Justin Inman Memorial
• Robert Super, THS: QuickDraw-Art
• Bly Trull, PHS: Cruso Friendship Club Jervis/Alexander and Smathers Cruso
• Brooks Valentine, PHS , Robert E. & Viola Forga
• Valeria Villarroel Venegas, THS: QuickDraw-Art
• Adam Wampler, THS: Haywood Regional Medical Center
• Jacqueline Webb, PHS , First Citizens Bank
• Grace Webb, HEC: First Citizens Bank and QuickDraw-Art
• Elliott Wells, THS: Teresa Kaye Ashe Memorial for Nursing
• Madison Wilson, PHS: Black Orthodontics
• Alyssa Wilson, PHS: Champion Credit Union-Roland Leatherwood


Haywood County Schools Foundation Awards $42,000 in Grants

Haywood County Schools Foundation gave 172 grants to teachers totaling $42,895 on November 13 at a Grant Recipient Reception at Tuscola High School.

Grants were sponsored by Duke Energy, Evergreen Packaging, First Citizens Banks, QuickDraw, the Arc of Haywood County, and the Haywood County Schools Foundation. The grants fund resources for teachers and staff to enrich the learning experience for students.

Teachers and staff from across the district applied for the grants this fall, and winners were selected after committees representing each grant reviewed applications.

“We are so happy to be able to partner with area organizations to be able to fund these innovative projects that our teachers have worked tirelessly to plan,” Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere said. “The projects these teachers are putting together in the classroom encourage creativity and ensure that our students are engaged in the learning process.”

Grants ranged from $200 to purchase LEGO kits for a fairy tale literature unit in a kindergarten class at Clyde Elementary, to $350 to purchase power grid models for Waynesville Middle School’s STEM class, to $375 to buy interview-appropriate attire for Pisgah High School Exceptional Children (EC) students.

“We consider it an honor to help teachers surround our children with books and continue to increase literacy rates in the county,” Kevin Wells, First Citizens Bank senior vice president, said. “Teachers are the real heroes here today because they have committed themselves to educating students by creating a strong foundation in reading.”

Each grant sponsor has different requirements and focuses of study. The Duke Energy and Evergreen Packaging grants focus on projects that promote math and science. The First Citizens Bank grant provides funding to schools and teachers for reading initiatives. The QuickDraw art grant provides funds for art teachers to purchase materials for art education projects.

Professional growth and development are the focus of the Haywood County Schools Foundation grant and is available to teachers, faculty, and staff. Funding for the professional development grants was raised through Haywood County Schools Foundation fundraisers like the Mardi Gras Ball and bingo.

If you would like more information about funding classroom projects, contact Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere at 828-456-2400.

2018-19 ARC Grant Recipients
• Gretchen Denton, Bethel
• Kathy Boyer, Bethel
• Melissa Collins, Bethel
• Chris Frodsham, BMS
• Karma Shuford, BMS
• Amanda Parton, Clyde
• Angela Ledford, Clyde
• Deah Branson, Clyde
• Gloria Rose, Clyde
• Jacqueline Willis, Clyde
• Sarah Floyd, Clyde
• Virginia Hawken, Clyde
• Deborah Brown, CMS
• Emily Ferguson, CMS
• Kim Ross / Tina Latrino, CMS
• Rebecca Massie, CMS/CHHS/THS/WMS
• Debbie Steinel, county-wide
• Katheryn Clontz, county-wide
• Mary Beth Brown, county-wide
• Mary Beth Brown / Reah Landau, county-wide
• Melanie Ashe, county-wide
• Angela Vinson Ray, Hazelwood
• Cristy Rogers, Hazelwood
• Kimberly Caron, Hazelwood
• Lana Brooks, Hazelwood
• Alda Chambers, Junaluska
• Kristi Blackburn, Junaluska
• Lauren Queen, Junaluska
• Rebecca Brown, Junaluska
• Danielle Ramsey, North Canton
• Jessica Igwe, North Canton
• Traci Wike, North Canton
• Chirs Amsler, PHS
• Courtney Phillips, PHS
• Lisa Cook, PHS
• Ashley Dillard, RES
• Casey Hooper, WMS
• Casey Roberts, WMS

2018-19 Duke Energy STEM Grant Recipients
• Jade Crawford, Bethel
• Sam Yancey, Bethel
• Sally Hundley, BMS
• Crystal Christy, Clyde
• Kim Serenius, Clyde
• Sophi Spurrier, Clyde
• Tenissa Higgins, Clyde
• Wendy Underwood, Clyde
• Laura Kirchner, Hazelwood
• Susan Delbene, Hazelwood
• John Serenius, Jonathan Valley
• Chase Smith, PHS
• Lisa Cook, PHS
• Michelle Mahoney, PHS
• Amanda Wells, WMS

2018-19 Evergreen Packaging Math and Science Grant Recipients
• Sam Yancey, Bethel
• Chris Frodsham, BMS
• Julie Smith, BMS
• Jan Davis, Clyde
• Wendy Underwood, Clyde
• Anita Painter, CMS
• Laura Kirchner, Hazelwood
• John Serenius, Jonathan Valley
• Michelle Burris, North Canton
• Valerie Guyer, North Canton
• Andrew Chase Smith, PHS
• Kristy Sorrells, PHS
• Lisa Cook, PHS
• Michelle Mahoney, PHS
• Timothy Shepard, PHS
• Elaine Hyatt, WMS
• Linda Estes, WMS
• Sandra Hermida, WMS
• Tara O’Loughlin, WMS
• William Saxon, WMS

2018-19 First Citizens Bank Reading Grant Recipients
• Crystal McCracken, BMS
• Julie Smith, BMS
• Angela Ledford, Clyde
• Gloria Rose, Clyde
• Karley Wells, Clyde
• Wendy Underwood, Clyde
• Thad Pickard, CMS
• Carol Clarke, Hazelwood
• Mary Mason, Jonathan Valley
• Lisa Cook, PHS
• Megan Wantz, THS
• Tara O’Loughlin, WMS

2018-19 Haywood County Schools Foundation Professional Development Grant Recipients
• Angela McHenry, Bethel
• Amy Harrington, BMS
• Angela Cloud, BMS
• Anita Clark, BMS
• Chris Frodsham, BMS
• Crystal McCracken, BMS
• Deidra Boone, BMS
• Dorothea Stewart, BMS
• Elise Parham, BMS
• Emily Fama, BMS
• Jennifer Mabry, BMS
• Julie Smith, BMS
• Karma Shuford, BMS
• Kendra Plemmons, BMS
• Michelle Knapik, BMS
• Rebecca Smith, BMS
• Ron Hundley, BMS
• Sally Hundley, BMS
• Spencer Reeves, BMS
• Angela Ledford, Clyde
• Carrie Hooper, Jonathan Valley
• Gloria Rose, Clyde
• Stephen Sharpe, Clyde
• Anita Painter, CMS
• Kathryn Clontz, county-wide
• Carol Clarke, Hazelwood
• Charlie Edwards, Junaluska
• Ira Hyde, Junaluska
• Melissa Williams, Meadowbrook
• Valerie Guyer, North Canton
• Ashlee Jones, PHS
• Chase Smith, PHS
• Emily Burrus, PHS
• Hannah Yucha, PHS
• Kristy Sorrells, PHS
• Lisa Cook, PHS
• Michelle Mahoney, PHS
• Stephanie Morgan, PHS
• Tabitha Judy, PHS
• Tim Shepard, PHS
• Alison Francis, SFS
• Angela Pless, SFS
• Barbara Fowler, SFS
• Betty White, SFS
• Brenda Wheeler, SFS
• Candy McCoy, SFS
• Chelsea Williams, SFS
• Jamie, SFS
• Jennifer Prouty, SFS
• Karen Jones, SFS
• Kathy Robertson, SFS
• Mary Ann Shoaf, SFS
• Michelle Booth, SFS
• Misty Griffin, SFS
• Paola Sandaval, SFS
• Robin Rogers, SFS
• Sheila McClure, SFS
• Sue Donahoe, SFS
• Vicky Messer, SFS
• Amy Garner, THS
• Lisa Burgin, THS
• Megean Wantz, THS
• Adam Stewart, WMS
• Alex Swanger, WMS
• Christine Basulto, WMS
• Elaine Hyatt, WMS
• Heather Sims, WMS
• Jennifer Mehaffey, WMS
• Jennifer Parton, WMS
• Jennifer Reeves, WMS
• Karen Kreitzburg, WMS
• Laura Turner, WMS
• Laurie Bass, WMS
• Noal Castater, WMS
• Rhonda Haney, WMS
• Samuel Bogan, WMS
• Sandra Hermida, WMS
• Tara O’Loughlin, WMS

2018-19 QuickDraw Art Education Grant Recipients
• Kellye Slate, Junaluska/Hazelwood
• Kara Faust, CMS
• Dustin Keyes, PHS
• Carrie Hooper, Jonathan Valley/Meadowbrook/North Canton
• Stephanie Kea, THS
• Angela Cloud, BMS/Riverbend
• Tara O’Loughlin, WMS
• Caroline Ottinger, Bethel/Clyde


Hayley Prince Named 2018 Teacher of the Year

Junaluska Elementary School fourth grade teacher Hayley Prince has been named the 2018-19 Haywood County Schools Teacher of the Year.

The annual award recognizes the most innovative and influential public school educators in the county. Prince was chosen out of a field of 15 other educators representing each of the district’s schools.

Over the past six years, Prince has taught hundreds of third, fourth, and fifth grade students at Junaluska Elementary School.

“One of the most prevalent factors that influenced me in becoming a teacher has to do with my own personal experience as a student of Haywood County Schools,” Prince, a Haywood County native, explained. “I remember so many of my teachers who went out of their way to not only help me learn the facts, but also cared about my social and emotional well being.”

Prince said she hopes to positively influence her students in a similar way.

Each morning, Prince greets her 25 fourth graders at the door with a smile and warm welcome to start the day.

“Elementary students are so special to me because they have an eagerness to learn and a curiosity about the world around them that only a child can express,” Prince said. “They are constantly taking their first steps into new frontiers of learning.”

Prince’s teaching philosophy is based on each student’s unique learning needs. At the beginning of each school year, Prince gets to know her students and discovers what motivates them to succeed.

“By giving my students a safe environment to learn, grow, and succeed regardless of their background, they can set high goals and achieve them,” Prince said.

For Prince, establishing positive relationships with her students goes beyond the classroom. It is not uncommon to see Prince at her students’ sporting events, music concerts, or karate competitions on the weekends. She believes these small gestures of showing care and interest in her students’ lives result in greater lifelong success.

“Ms. Prince is very sweet and understanding, and everyone in my class is kind,” Lizzie Clark, a fourth grader in Prince’s class, said. “She reminds us that we can always make new friends anywhere we go.”

Prince said she wants her students to go home each day knowing that they accomplished something that will benefit them throughout their whole life.

“It was not until the first time I had to say goodbye to a classroom of students that I fully realized the difference my instruction and influence had made in their educational development,” Prince recalled. “While many professions measure rewards in sales volumes and bonuses, teaching measures rewards in the ability of a child to comprehend a new idea and build a relationship with someone they can trust.”

Prince smiled as she recounted a number of students who are now in middle and high school who still keep in contact with her.

“I always wanted to be a teacher, but winning Teacher of the Year just affirms everything I’ve worked so hard at over the years,” Prince said. “The outpouring of support from my family, community, school, and current and former students has been so overwhelming.”

Education officials praised Prince’s ability to build relationships with her students while teaching everything from North Carolina history to conceptual math.

“Ms. Prince goes above and beyond to reach all of her students,” Alex Masciarelli, Junaluska Elementary School principal, said. “Her passion and sincerity are evident at first glance.”

Haywood County Schools Superintendent Dr. Bill Nolte said Prince embodies the passion and dedication of the district’s more than 500 public school teachers.

“Our students wouldn’t be successful if it wasn’t for our employees who protect them, feed them, get them to school on time, teach them, and love them every day,” Dr. Nolte said during the Teacher of the Year banquet on September 7. “One of my greatest pleasures as superintendent is visiting classrooms, and Ms. Prince’s classroom is a great representation of the wonderful teachers we have in our school district.”

As Teacher of the Year, Prince received a monetary award from Haywood County Schools and will be recognized again in the spring with an Evergreen Packaging award from the Haywood County Schools Foundation. She will also now be considered for the WNC Regional Teacher of the Year award.

Over the next year, Prince will act as an ambassador for teachers throughout the county and will serve on several district-wide committees.

2018-19 Teachers of the Year from each school include:
• Courtney Meyers, Bethel Elementary
• Julie Green, Bethel Middle School
• Deborah Brown, Canton Middle School
• Bronson Gross, Central Haywood High School
• Sophi Spurrier, Clyde Elementary School
• Ryan Brumfield, Haywood Early College
• Rebekah Wilson, Hazelwood Elementary School
• Kathy Swanger, Jonathan Valley Elementary School
• Hayley Prince, Junaluska Elementary School
• Courtney Smith, Meadowbrook Elementary School
• Valerie Guyer, North Canton Elementary School
• Callie Rogers, Pisgah High School
• Leslie Buchanan, Riverbend Elementary School
• Stephanie Kea, Tuscola High School
• Casey Roberts, Waynesville Middle School


HCSF Faculty Grants Open

Applications are now open for 2018 Haywood County Schools Foundation faculty grants.

This year, grants are sponsored by Duke Energy, Evergreen Packaging, First Citizens Banks, QuickDraw, the Arc of Haywood County, and the Haywood County Schools Foundation. The grants fund resources for teachers and staff to enrich the learning experience for students.

Applications must be submitted electronically at www.hcsf.haywood.k12.nc.us before October 1, 2018. Teachers applying for multiple grants must submit an application for each grant. Applications for the Arc of Haywood County grants have already been emailed to exceptional children (EC) teachers.

Winners will be selected after committees representing each grant review applications. Teachers who won grants will be invited to a Grant Recipient Reception at Tuscola High School on November 13.

Each grant sponsor has different requirements and focuses of study. The QuickDraw art grant provides funds for art teachers to purchase materials for art education projects. The First Citizens Bank grant provides funding to schools and teachers for reading initiatives. The Evergreen Packaging grant focuses on projects that promote math and science. The Duke Energy grant is for projects in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Professional growth and development are the focus of the Haywood County Schools Foundation grant and is available to teachers, faculty, and staff. Funding for the professional development grants is raised through Haywood County Schools Foundation fundraisers like the Mardi Gras Ball and bingo. The Arc of Haywood County provides grants to Haywood County Schools’ EC teachers.

Last year, the Haywood County Schools Foundation gave 160 grants to teachers totaling $38,877.

For more information, contact Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere at jwood@haywood.k12.nc.us or call 828-456-2400.


Excellence in Education May Winners

The Haywood County Schools Foundation recognized Bethel Elementary School teacher Meredith Allen and Bethel Middle School teacher Ron Hundley with Excellence in Education awards for the month of May.

The Excellence in Education program recognizes teachers from Haywood County Schools who exemplify a commitment to innovative teaching practices and show dedication to student success. The program is sponsored by Jack Bishop of Edward Jones and the Haywood County Schools Foundation.

“Our teachers in Haywood County changes students’ lives for the better every day,” Bishop said. “This gift is just a small thank you from our office for everything they do for our children.”

Each month, teachers from the 15 Haywood County Schools are recognized with an Excellence in Education award. Award winners are presented with a certificate and a $100 check sponsored by Bishop.

“Teachers are some of the most influential role models that our students have,” Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere said. “Ms. Allen and Mr. Hundley, like so many of our teachers, truly care about the wellbeing of their students.”

MEREDITH ALLEN
Third grade teacher Meredith Allen is currently finishing up her fifth year of teaching at Bethel Elementary School. At any given time, Allen is teaching her third graders about everything from current events to how to write reports to multiplication.

Allen said her main goal as a teacher is to design learning tasks that encourage students to develop independence and responsibility.

“I try to lead them through the process of learning but put a lot of emphasis on working in small groups to foster that sense of independence and responsibility,” Allen explained. “When they are collaborating with their classmates, they are building off what they already know.”

Like many teachers, Allen says she cannot imagine doing anything else.

“Elementary school is such an exciting time because kids are learning so much so fast,” Allen said. “I love seeing things click for kids, especially when they have struggled with something and then their hard work and perseverance pays off and they get it.”

RON HUNDLEY
For the past 21 years, Ron Hundley has been teaching Haywood County Schools’ middle school students. He taught at Waynesville Middle School for 15 years and has been teaching at Bethel Middle School for the past six years.

Hundley currently teaches eighth grade math. His lesson plans cover linear functions and the Pythagorean Theory, but Hundley says he teaches much more than that.

“My students learn not to be intimidated by math, and that it’s ok to get frustrated by it sometimes as long as you make up your mind to persevere,” Hundley said. “Besides math, they learn to value other’s insight into solving problems, and just because we did a problem in different ways, that doesn’t mean that one of us is wrong.”

When Hundley is not in the classroom, he is most likely in the gym or on the field coaching sports. He coached soccer at Waynesville Middle for 13 years and has been a basketball coach at Bethel Middle for four years.

While many might think spending that much time with middle school students would be difficult, Hundley said that he enjoys the interactions he has with his eighth graders.

“I get to laugh many times a day, but I also really like getting to be a part of teenagers discovering that they can figure stuff out on their own,” Hundley explained. “In class, we celebrate the thought process as much as right answers, because learning to think and reason will serve them well in their future – both in school and life in general.”


Waynesville Gallery Association Donates Art Supplies

The Waynesville Gallery Association recently collected art supplies for Haywood County Schools’ art teachers as part of its Winter Arts Smokies Style festivities.

The entire event was organized by the Waynesville Gallery Association, which supports the rich cultural heritage of Western North Carolina by creating opportunities for artists to interact with the public.

Artists and community members donated everything from crayons to oil paints to yarn for the supply drive during the month of March.

“Everyone learns on different levels,” Janet Metzger, owner of Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery, said. “Art is a way to expand productivity and increase creativity in our children.”

Members of the Waynesville Gallery Association include Cedar Hill Studio, Art by Mollie, Mountain Favors, Twigs and Leaves Gallery, Moose Crossing Burl Wood Gallery, the Haywood County Arts Council, Earthworks Gallery, the Jeweler’s Work Bench, T. Pennington Art Gallery, and Village Framer. The art supply drive also received support from other shops on Main Street, Goblin Lane Gifts, and Joe Rich Kelly.


Haywood County Schools Foundation Awards 131 Scholarships

The Haywood County Schools Foundation surprised 99 Pisgah, Tuscola, Haywood Early College, and Central Haywood high school students with 131 scholarships totaling $217,900 on May 4. Scholarship amounts ranged from $300 to $40,000.

Unsuspecting students from each school were called to the library where they were greeted by Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere.

“We are so proud of each one of you in here, and we can’t wait to see and hear about your success in college,” Valliere said with a smile. “The fact that you were chosen to receive one of these scholarships based on your application is a really big deal, and you should be proud of yourselves.”

Kendall Myers, a senior at Tuscola High School, received the largest scholarship offered by the Haywood County Schools Foundation, the James and Betty Scott Memorial Scholarship.

The Scott scholarship is up to a $10,000 annual award and is renewable for four years; totaling $40,000. The scholarship is open to Tuscola seniors who have a high degree of need coupled with a serious commitment to achieve a college education.

“Receiving this scholarship definitely takes the burden of paying for college off of my parents and myself,” Myers said. “I just want to thank the scholarship committee for awarding me this scholarship because now I can attend college with a little less stress and be able to focus on my studies.”

Myers will attend Western Carolina University to major in nursing. She hopes to work as a registered nurse for a few years before going back to college to become a nurse practitioner.

All scholarship recipients will be recognized at a Partners in Education ceremony on May 21 at Tuscola High School.

The Haywood County Schools Foundation was established in 1983 and is the longest running educational foundation in North Carolina.

Currently, the Foundation manages more than 60 scholarships that have been established by businesses and individuals in the community. Scholarships may be endowed or funded annually. Criteria for awarding the scholarship are designed by the donors and the Foundation Board of Directors. Endowed scholarships are generated through the investment of permanently-held principals, so that only the income from the principal is used for scholarship awards.

For more information about donating to a scholarship fund or setting up a scholarship through the Haywood County Schools Foundation, contact Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere at 828-456-2400 or visit www.hcsf.haywood.k12.nc.us.


Pisgah Receives $10,000 Gene Haas Donation

For the third year in a row, Pisgah High School’s machining program received a $10,000 grant from the Gene Haas Foundation.

The grant will be used to provide scholarships to Pisgah seniors who plan to major in a manufacturing or engineering related field in college. Students are eligible to receive up to a $2,000 scholarship.

“Haas really supports education, and we’ve received tremendous support from them in the form of equipment discounts, technical support, and monetary donations,” Pisgah machining teacher Chip Singleton explained. “Machining is such a great career field for our students. It has a wide range of appeal because they can go to work right out of high school or go on to college and get a two- or four-year degree.”

The Gene Haas Foundation was established in 1999 by Gene Haas, the owner of Haas Automation, Inc. Haas Automation is a billion-dollar company and is America’s leading builder of CNC machine tools. The Foundation is focused on giving scholarships to students who are pursuing CNC machinist training.

Kip Asmuth, a sales engineer with Phillips, presented Singleton with the $10,000 check. Phillips is the Southeast’s sole distributer of Haas equipment.

“I’ve worked with Chip for years, and he’s developed a really innovative machining program here at Pisgah,” Asmuth said. “Chip’s program opens up many doors for students to become a part of the fast-growing, high-tech machining field.”

Lance Shallenberger, a senior in Singleton’s machining level III class, filled out a scholarship application and is hoping to benefit from the Haas Foundation donation. He will be attending Western Carolina University this fall to major in engineering technology.

“I’ve learned how to operate manual machines all the way up to creating CNC codes and running it on the large machines,” Shallenberger said. “I like being able to see what I’m designing on the computer and then making a finished product on the machine.”

Shallenberger, an avid outdoorsman, hopes to one day work for a mountain bike company as an engineer.

The training that students, like Shallenberger, receive in Pisgah’s machining program is meant to set themselves, as well as companies and the local economy, up for success.

According to a recent report from the Manufacturing Institute, the skills gap in the U.S. manufacturing industry is expected to result in two million jobs going unfilled over the next decade.

Factors contributing to the shortage of skilled workforce include baby boomer retirements, economic expansion, loss of embedded knowledge due to movement of experienced workers, a negative image of the manufacturing industry among younger generations, lack of STEM skills among workers, and a gradual decline of technical education programs in public high schools.

At Pisgah’s career fair in March, many manufacturing companies in the surrounding areas reported that they had the difficult task of hiring highly-skilled workers to build in-demand products.

“Our machining program is working to build a pipeline of qualified and dedicated young workers who are excited about manufacturing and eager to launch a successful career,” Singleton said.


Excellence in Education April Winners

The Haywood County Schools Foundation recognized Clyde Elementary School media specialist Megean Wantz and Tuscola High School teacher Dawn Williams Tox with Excellence in Education awards for the month of April.

The Excellence in Education program recognizes teachers from Haywood County Schools who exemplify a commitment to innovative teaching practices and show dedication to student success. The program is sponsored by Jack Bishop of Edward Jones and the Haywood County Schools Foundation.

“Teachers are such an important part of the Haywood County community,” Bishop said. “This gift is just a small thank you from our office for preparing our children for success.”

Each month, teachers from the 15 Haywood County Schools are recognized with an Excellence in Education award. Award winners are presented with a certificate and a $100 check sponsored by Bishop.

“Teachers do so much in today’s world. They are listening, coaching, and mentoring the future generation,” Haywood County Schools Foundation Executive Director Jenny Wood Valliere said. “Ms. Wantz and Ms. Williams Tox, like so many of our teachers, are bringing out the best in each of their students.”

MEGEAN WANTZ
Megean Wantz began her educational career seven years ago as a classroom teacher. While her husband was serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, Wantz worked in Onslow County, N.C. as a first and third grade teacher before switching to the library as a media specialist. Since moving to Haywood County three years ago, she has been the media specialist at Clyde Elementary School.

Wantz said her media center is not set up like libraries on television shows or in movies. There are no quiet signs, and there is no librarian shushing kids.

“Libraries should be loud and active because students are collaborating with each other,” Wantz explained. “I have tried to create an environment where students are encouraged to work together, explore new technologies and information, and solve real-world problems.”

Wantz works with teachers in each grade level to reinforce their curriculum with library projects. She is also responsible for teaching students library skills, about new technology, and how to conduct research.

Like so many in education, Wantz said she loves her job because of the students.

“I love having deep meaningful conversations with the kids and watching them grow,” Wantz said. “Every day is different, and I’m always excited to see what each day will hold.”

DAWN WILLIAMS TOX
Dawn Williams Tox brings a global perspective to her Spanish classes at Tuscola High School. Prior to teaching at Tuscola, Williams Tox taught middle and high school in Guatemala and English as a Second Language (ESL) at Haywood Community College and with Haywood County Schools.

In both her Spanish 2 and Spanish 5 classes, she weaves in lessons on culture, food, social norms, and current events, along with typical vocabulary and conversation instruction.

“My classroom is all about collaboration because to learn new languages, we need other people,” Williams Tox explained. “Like pretty much anything in life worth doing, my students have to listen, talk, make a ton of mistakes, try new things, and support each other.”

Williams Tox said her ultimate goal as a Spanish teacher is seeing her students develop usable language skills. By the end of Spanish 5, students should be able to hypothetically visit any Spanish-speaking environment and quickly join a conversation.

“Teenagers are amazing and remind me to laugh every day,” Williams Tox said. “I love listening to their enthusiasm for whatever it is that interests them because that vigor and life is contagious.”


Pisgah Students Look to the Future

Hundreds of high school seniors and dozens of local businesses filled Pisgah High School’s auxiliary gym for the school’s third-annual career day on March 29.

Representatives from across industries including Evergreen, Giles Chemical, Champion Credit Union, Neo Corporation, GE Aviation, and many others answered students’ questions about qualifications, typical work days, and career paths.

“We view the career day as a way to demonstrate to teens that high school is the opportune time to equip themselves to make career or college choices that will provide future financial stability,” Lynn Ray, Haywood County Schools’ career development coordinator, said. “Everyone is going to get a job eventually, whether it’s entry-level or a CEO and everything in between.”

Representatives from Haywood Community College and Western Carolina University were also in attendance to answer questions about fields of study.

“I’m really glad that Western was here today, and I could talk with someone about their nursing program,” Natalia Rodriguez, a senior, said. “I want to be a nurse because I want to help people.”

Haywood Regional Medical Center’s table was also crowded with students interested in working in health care.

“I’m getting my CNA this year through my public health class here at school,” senior Tyson Willis said. “I’d love to start working at the hospital this year as a CNA, and I want to continue my education and end up working in some type of forensic pathology.”

Although many of the employers present at the career fair employ professionals in a variety of departments such as accounting, human resources, and marketing, the majority of businesses were scouting for technical positions.

“Machinists make up about 80 percent of our workforce, and I would say about a third of our machinists at our Marion plant are Pisgah and Tuscola graduates,” Alan Burnette, ABB HR business partner, said. “The schools and people in Haywood County understand the great opportunities that careers like machining offer to young people.”

Haywood County Schools’ Career and Technical Education (CTE) program is working to bridge the gap between students and employers by directly preparing students for high-wage, high-demand careers.

Agriculture, pulp and paper, drafting, welding, masonry, and machining are all a part of the school system’s CTE program. Even within one CTE field, a variety of jobs are available.

At the conclusion of Pisgah’s career day, the school had an apprenticeship signing ceremony for two seniors who recently began working at GE Aviation in Asheville.

Since January 15, Lucas McCracken and Kyler Fouts have been leaving Pisgah each day after second period to go work at GE Aviation as machinist apprentices.

McCracken works in an area making mid seals, which go into the hottest part of a jet’s engine, and Fouts’ department makes the front outer seal that holds the plane’s engine together.

“I’m looking forward to the tradeoff of getting a good, high-paying job real soon,” Fouts said.

Apprenticeships integrate school-based and work-based learning to instruct students in employability and occupational skills, such as machining, needed by local industries. The Pisgah seniors attend classes in the morning to meet high school graduation requirements and then work at their apprenticeship from 12:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Both seniors agree that the hardest part of the apprenticeship for them is making time for family and friends while still going to school and working 30 hours a week.

“It’s been a tough adjustment, but it really is the opportunity of a lifetime to be in high school and already have a career,” McCracken explained.

Since 2005, the machining program at Pisgah has partnered with local businesses to place seniors in apprenticeships. Chip Singleton, Pisgah machining teacher, has worked to increase the rigor of his classroom curriculum and to teach skills needed in today’s precision machining industry.

“At GE Aviation, we make pretty much anything that goes into a plane that spins or rotates,” Sarah Hutcheson, GE Aviation employee HR manager, said. “We are so happy to have such a great relationship with Pisgah, and we continue to partner with them because they are turning out the kind of employees we need.”

Many of the CTE programs, like machining, offer high schoolers a jumpstart on their future by giving them a chance to have a college transcript started and certifications all free of charge. Between Tuscola, Pisgah, and Central Haywood high schools, more than 20 classes are available that offer articulated credit at N.C. community colleges.

At the end of the school year, McCracken and Fouts will begin working full-time at GE Aviation. Both said they plan to take advantage of tuition reimbursement programs at GE by completing coursework to receive their associate degree in Computer-Integrated Machining from Haywood Community College.